Industrial/Commercial Subdivisions

Industrial or Commercial Subdivisions

We encourage potential applicants to discuss their proposed subdivision with the Planning Department (771-2034) before submitting any documentation. The Planning staff can help the applicant identify any constraints or requirements the applicant will need to address. In some instances, the applicant may want to receive support in principle from Council before pursuing their application further, as the proposal will need to receive Council's approval. The applicant should also ensure conformity with the RM's OCP and Zoning Bylaw at this time. 

Reviewing the information in the Rezoning and Subdivision Application Checklist (PDF) will be helpful in understanding the subdivision process.

Because the RM is not a subdivision approving authority, all applications to subdivide land are approved through the Provincial Community Planning Branch of the Ministry of Government Relations. A Plan of Proposed Subdivision drafted by a surveyor needs to be submitted to Community Planning, along with the Application to Subdivide Land. Community Planning may request additional information or ask that changes be made to the application prior to approval. ‚ÄčOther relevent parties (SaskPower, etc.) may review the application and provide comments.

More information about what is required can be found on the Ministry of Government Relations webpage.

The RM will pursue any necessary rezoning while Community Planning processes the subdivision application.

Concept Plans

For multi-parcel industrial or commercial developments, the RM may request that a Concept Plan be submitted. The Concept Plan must be comprehensive in nature and speak to aspects such as servicing, access, land use, pedestrian connectivity, and impacts on adjacent land uses. Sections 3.7 and 3.8 of the Zoning Bylaw outline all requirements of a Concept Plan. ‚Äč

Concept Plan Example

The purpose of a Concept Plan is to ensure that all aspects of a proposal comply with the RM's development standards in both the OCP and the Zoning Bylaw. A Concept Plan can also help answer any questions Council may have before considering its approval.

Large-scale multi-parcel developments still require the approval of Community Planning and must be rezoned appropriately.

Municipal Reserve

As per the Planning and Development Act, 2007, municipalities are required to obtain Municipal Reserve as part of every subdivision except for the first subdivision out of every quarter section. For commercial and industrial subdivisions, Municipal Reserve is a dedication of 5% of the total subdivided land area that will be used by the municipality for public ammenities. In some instances, Council has the authority to ask for cash-in-lieu rather than a land dedication.

Servicing Agreements

Municipalities have the authority to enter into a Servicing Agreement with any landowners and developers involved in a subdivision. A Servicing Agreement outlines the responsibilities of all parties for the provision of services such as water, sewer, power, etc.

The fees for Servicing Fees are as follows:

Single Parcel Subdivision: $4000

Multi-Parcel Subdivision: $8000 per parcel

 

If you are submitting any type of application to the RM on behalf of another landowner, please complete the Declaration by Applicant form.